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COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

Public Information Line


  • How many cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Florida?
  • Okaloosa County Coronavirus Summary Reports
  • Okaloosa County Key Metrics
  • Where can I get tested?
  • Where can I get vaccinated?
  • Where can I get information about monoclonal antibodies (Eli Lilly's bamlanivimab and Regeneron's casirivimab/imdevimab )?
  • What are the signs/symptoms of COVID-19?
  • CDC Order: Wearing of face masks while on conveyances and at transportation hubs
  • COVID-19 or Seasonal Allergies?
  • COVID-19 Scams
  • Hand Sanitizers Consumers Should Not Use
  • I already had COVID-19. Am I immune?
  • Return to Work/Community Activities After COVID-19 Infection in Adults
  • Antibody Testing for COVID-19
  • Cleaning and disinfecting your home
  • Considering traveling? Including in U.S., out of country, or a cruise?
  • How does the virus spread?
  • What can I do to prevent COVID-19?
  • Plasma Donations from Recovered COVID-19 Patients
  • Contact tracing
  • Options to reduce quarantine
  • Considerations for wearing masks
  • If I were exposed to COVID-19, how long would it take for me to become sick?
  • What are the treatments?
  • American Red Cross Virtual Family Assistance Center

Updated 4/13/2021.

There are 2,134,914 Florida cases. There have been 34,784 deaths.  

Okaloosa County has had 19,999 reported cases. There have been 357 deaths.

Stay up-to-date with the latest COVID-19 data by visiting the dashboard here.

These reports will be published Monday-Friday. Saturday and Sunday will be published on Monday. The comprehensive county report (PDF) is published daily. 

2021

March

3.04.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
3.01.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)

February

2.28.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 88KB)
2.27.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 88KB)
2.25.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 89KB)
2.24.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 88KB)
2.23.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
2.22.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.21.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.19.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.18.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.16.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.15.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 88KB)
2.12.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.11.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.10.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.09.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.08.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
2.05.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
2.04.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
2.03.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
2.02.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
2.01.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 89KB)

January

1.31.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
1.28.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
1.27.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
1.26.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
1.25.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
1.22.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
1.20.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
1.07.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
1.04.2021 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)

2020

December

12.30.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 75KB)
12.29.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 75KB)
12.28.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 74KB)
12.27.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 76KB)
12.24.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 74KB)
12.23.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.22.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
12.21.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
12.20.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
12.18.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
12.17.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.16.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.15.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.14.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.13.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.11.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
12.10.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
12.09.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.08.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
12.07.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.06.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
12.04.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.03.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
12.02.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
12.01.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)

November

11.30.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
11.29.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
11.27.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
11.25.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
11.24.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
11.23.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
11.22.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
11.20.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 101KB)
11.19.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
11.18.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
11.17.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
11.16.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
11.15.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
11.14.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
11.13.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
11.12.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
11.11.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
11.10.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
11.09.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
11.08.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
11.07.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
11.06.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
11.05.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
11.04.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
11.03.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
11.02.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
11.01.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)

October

10.31.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
10.30.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
10.29.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
10.28.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 77KB)
10.27.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 77KB)
10.26.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 86KB)
10.25.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 78KB)
10.23.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 77KB)
10.22.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 78KB)
10.21.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 78KB)
10.20.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
10.19.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 100KB)
10.18.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
10.16.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
10.15.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 99KB)
10.14.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 99KB)
10.13.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
10.12.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 100KB)
10.11.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 99KB)
10.9.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
10.8.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
10.7.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
10.6.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
10.5.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
10.4.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
10.3.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
10.2.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
10.1.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)

September 

09.30.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 106KB)
09.29.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.28.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
09.27.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.25.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.24.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
09.23.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.22.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.21.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
09.20.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
09.18.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.17.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.16.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
09.15.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
09.14.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
09.13.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
09.12.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 99KB)
09.11.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.10.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
09.09.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
09.08.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
09.07.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 98KB)
09.06.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 99KB)
09.04.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.03.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
09.02.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 97KB)
09.01.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB) 

August

08.31.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
08.30.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 96KB)
08.28.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
08.27.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
08.26.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
08.25.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
08.24.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
08.23.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 95KB)
08.22.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
08.21.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
08.20.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
08.19.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 134KB)
08.18.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
08.17.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 93KB)
08.16.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 133KB)
08.14.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 94KB)
08.13.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
08.12.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 132KB)
08.11.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
08.10.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
08.09.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 132KB)
08.08.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
08.07.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
08.06.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
08.05.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 131KB)
08.04.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
08.03.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
08.02.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
08.01.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)

July

07.31.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.30.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.29.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 131KB)
07.28.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.27.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
07.26.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 90KB)
07.24.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
07.23.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.22.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.21.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.20.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
07.19.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.18.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.17.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
07.16.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
07.15.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
07.14.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.13.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
07.12.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92KB)
07.11.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91KB)
07.10.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 3MB)
07.09.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 86 KB)
07.08.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 85 KB)
07.07.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 86 KB)
07.06.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 86 KB)
07.05.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 86 KB)
07.04.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 84 KB)
07.03.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 85 KB)
07.02.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 85 KB)
07.01.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 85 KB)

June

06.30.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 85 KB)
06.29.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 86 KB)
06.28.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 86 KB)
06.26.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 3 MB)
06.25.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 84 KB)
06.24.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 85 KB)
06.23.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 85 KB)
06.22.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 85 KB)
06.21.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 85 KB)
06.18.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
06.17.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.16.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
06.15.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
06.14.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.13.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.12.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.11.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.10.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.09.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 84 KB)
06.08.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.07.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 84 KB)
06.05.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.04.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.03.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
06.02.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
06.01.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)

May

05.31.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
05.30.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
05.29.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
05.28.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
05.27.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)
05.26.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
05.25.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
05.24.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
05.23.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
05.22.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 89 KB)
05.21.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 81 KB)
05.20.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 81 KB)
05.19.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 76 KB)
05.18.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 81 KB)
05.17.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 81 KB)
05.16.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 68 KB)
05.15.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 89 KB)
05.14.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 81 KB)
05.13.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 81 KB)
05.11.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 82 KB)
05.08.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 82 KB)
05.07.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 81 KB)
05.06.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 87 KB)
05.05.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
05.04.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 89 KB)
05.03.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 81 KB)
05.02.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 83 KB)
05.01.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 83 KB)

April

04.30.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 83 KB)
04.29.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 92 KB)
04.28.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 81 KB)
04.27.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 81 KB)
04.26.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 81KB )
04.25.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
04.24.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 82 KB)
04.23.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 92 KB)
04.22.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91 KB)
04.21.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 81 KB) 
04.20.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 80 KB)
04.19.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 81 KB)
04.18.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91 KB)
04.15.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report (PDF 91 KB)
04.14.2020 Okaloosa County COVID-19 Report(PDF 90 KB)

If you are seriously ill, seek care at an area urgent care center or a hospital emergency department. 

Other Providers Providing COVID-19 Testing PDF 117KB(This list is not all inclusive) Testing may not be available due to demand and the availability of testing materials. Please call before going to a provider listed.

Visit our COVID-19 vaccine webpage for more information about the COVID-19 Vaccine

Contact to covid.therapeutics@flhealth.gov for more information.

The HHS map for locating infusion sites can be found at

https://protect public.hhs.gov/pages/therapeutics-distribution

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness.

Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms or combinations of symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Fatigue
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea

Children have similar symptoms to adults and generally have mild illness

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an Order  on January 29, 2021 requiring the wearing of masks by travelers to prevent spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. Conveyance operators must also require all persons onboard to wear masks when boarding, disembarking, and for the duration of travel. Operators of transportation hubs must require all persons to wear a mask when entering or on the premises of a transportation hub.

This Order must be followed by all passengers on public conveyances (e.g., airplanes, ships, ferries, trains, subways, buses, taxis, ride-shares) traveling into, within, or out of the United States as well as conveyance operators (e.g., crew, drivers, conductors, and other workers involved in the operation of conveyances) and operators of transportation hubs ( e.g., airports, bus or ferry terminals, train or subway stations, seaports, ports of entry) or any other area that provides transportation in the United States.

People must wear masks that cover both the mouth and nose when awaiting, boarding, traveling on, or disembarking public conveyances. People must also wear masks when entering or on the premises of a transportation hub in the United States.

The following do not fulfill the requirements of the Order:

  • Masks worn in a way that does not cover both the mouth and nose
  • Face shields or goggles (face shields or goggles may be worn to supplement a mask that meets above required attributes)
  • Scarves, ski masks, balaclavas, or bandannas
  • Shirt or sweater collars (e.g., turtleneck collars) pulled up over the mouth and nose.
  • Masks made from loosely woven fabric or that are knitted, i.e., fabrics that let light pass through
  • Masks made from materials that are hard to breathe through (such as vinyl, plastic or leather)
  • Masks containing slits, exhalation valves, or punctures
  • Masks that do not fit properly (large gaps, too loose or too tight)

People are not required to wear a mask under the following circumstances:

  • while eating, drinking, or taking medication for brief periods of time;
  • while communicating, for brief periods of time, with a person who is hearing impaired when the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication;
  • if, on an aircraft, wearing of oxygen masks is needed because of loss of cabin pressure or other event affecting aircraft ventilation;
  • if unconscious (for reasons other than sleeping), incapacitated, unable to be awakened, or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance; or
  • when necessary to temporarily remove the mask to verify one’s identity such as during Transportation Security Administration (TSA) screening or when asked to do so by the ticket or gate agent or any law enforcement official.

The following categories of people are exempt from the requirement to wear a mask:

  • A child under the age of 2 years;
  • A person with a disability who cannot wear a mask, or cannot safely wear a mask, for reasons related to the disability;
  • A person for whom wearing a mask would create a risk to workplace health, safety, or job duty as determined by the relevant workplace safety guidelines or federal regulations.

People on board the following categories of conveyances are exempt from the requirement to wear a mask:

  • Private conveyances operated only for personal, non-commercial use;
  • Commercial motor vehicles or trucks, if the driver is the only person in the vehicle or truck;
  • Conveyances operated by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) as long as the operator of the conveyance follows all DOD requirements to prevent spread of COVID-19.

The Florida Department of Health is warning residents to be wary of potential coronavirus-related scams that target people during the global pandemic.

Telephone scams regarding COVID-19 test results have been reported by Floridians.

Residents have been contacted by callers stating they are with the Florida Department of Health and request social security numbers and medical information before the caller can provide “COVID-19 results”.

Below are tips for how to protect yourself from scams, including the COVID-19 phone scam:

  • The Department will not call to ask for social security numbers or medical information
  • Never share your personal or financial information via email, text messages, or over the phone.
  • Be cautious if you’re being pressured to share any information or make a payment immediately.
  • Scammers often spoof phone numbers to trick you into answering or responding.
  • Remember that government agencies will never call you to ask for personal information or money. Do not click any links in a text message or email that you are unsure of.
  • If someone is approached at their home by anyone claiming to work for the Florida Department of Health or dressed in protective medical gear, they are encouraged to ask for verification. All DOH staff will have a badge displayed.

FDA is warning consumers and health care professionals about certain hand sanitizer products, that are labeled to contain ethanol or isopropyl alcohol but have tested positive for 1-propanol or methanol contamination.

1-propanol, not to be confused with 2-propanol/isopropanol/isopropyl alcohol, is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizer products marketed in the United States and can be toxic and life-threatening when ingested.

Methanol, or wood alcohol, is a substance that can be toxic when absorbed through the skin or ingested and can be life-threatening when ingested.

List of hand santizers consumers should not use

At this time, we have limited information about reinfections with the virus that causes COVID-19. This is a new virus, and CDC is actively working to learn more. We will provide updates as they become available. Data to date show that a person who has had and recovered from COVID-19 may have low levels of virus in their bodies for up to 3 months after diagnosis. This means that if the person who has recovered from COVID-19 is retested within 3 months of initial infection, they may continue to have a positive test result, even though they are not spreading COVID-19.

There are no confirmed reports to date of a person being reinfected with COVID-19 within 3 months of initial infection. However, additional research is ongoing. 

If a person who has recovered from COVID-19 has new symptoms of COVID-19, the person may need an evaluation for reinfection, especially if the person has had close contact with someone infected with COVID-19. The person should isolate and contact a healthcare provider to be evaluated for other causes of their symptoms, and possibly retested.

The CDC now recommends a symptom- (or time-) based strategy based on accumulating evidence that prolonged isolation is unnecessary while awaiting a post-recovery COVID-19 test.

Key findings (with citations) include:

  1. Concentrations of SARS-CoV-2 RNA measured in upper respiratory specimens decline after onset of symptoms.
  2. The likelihood of recovering replication-competent virus also declines after onset of symptoms. For patients with mild to moderate COVID-19, replication-competent virus has not been recovered after 10 days following symptom onset. Recovery of replication-competent virus between 10 and 20 days after symptom onset has been documented in some persons with severe COVID-19 that, in some cases, was complicated by immunocompromised state. However, in this series of patients, it was estimated that 88% and 95% of their specimens no longer yielded replication-competent virus after 10 and 15 days, respectively, following symptom onset.
  3. A large contact tracing study demonstrated that high-risk household and hospital contacts did not develop infection if their exposure to a case patient started 6 days or more after the case patient’s illness onset.
  4. Although replication-competent virus was not isolated 3 weeks after symptom onset, recovered patients can continue to have SARS-CoV-2 RNA (COVID virus name) detected in their upper respiratory specimens for up to 12 weeks. Investigation of 285 “persistently positive” persons, which included 126 persons who had developed recurrent symptoms, found no secondary infections among 790 contacts attributable to contact with these case patients. Efforts to isolate replication-competent virus from 108 of these case patients were unsuccessful.
  5. Specimens from patients who recovered from an initial COVID-19 illness and subsequently developed new symptoms and retested positive by PCR did not have replication-competent virus detected. The risk of reinfection may be lower in the first 3 months after initial infection, based on limited evidence from another betacoronavirus (HCoV-OC43), the genus to which SARS-CoV-2 belongs.
  6. Currently, 6 months after the emergence of SARS-CoV-2, there have been no confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 reinfection. However, the number of areas where sustained infection pressure has been maintained, and therefore reinfections would be most likely observed, remains limited.
  7. Serologic or other correlates of immunity have not yet been established. (Antibody testing should not be used to indicate recovery).

Duration of Isolation and Precautions

  1. For most persons with mild to moderate COVID-19 illness, isolation and precautions are discontinued 10 days after symptom onsetand resolution of fever for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing medications, and with improvement of symptoms.
  2. For persons who never develop symptoms, isolation and other precautions are discontinued 10 days after the date of their first positive PCR test for the virus that causes COVID-19.
  3. A limited number of persons with severe to critical illness may produce replication-competent virus beyond 10 days that may warrant extending duration of isolation and precautions for up to 20 days after symptom onset. This group of individuals will usually be under the care of physician and will follow the physician’s guidance for return to work.

In all cases, PCR testing after COVID-19 illness IS NOT RECOMMENDED within 3 months after the date of symptom onset for the initial COVID-19 infection. In addition, quarantine is not recommended in the event of close contact with an infected person. Therefore, persons infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 should not be excluded from work awaiting a negative PCR test for COVID-19. The DOH-Okaloosa will provide a return to work clearance via email (or via mail) for persons in Group 1 and 2 above if required by their employer. Group 3 may receive return to work clearance from either a physician or the health department, if needed.

We encourage ALL employers to modify their requirements for negative PCR test results before return to work. This needlessly prolongs isolation, keeps valued employees from returning to work and results in the unnecessary use of laboratory testing resources.

There are some antibody tests approved by the FDA under Emergency Use Authorization. Make sure any antibody test you take has FDA EUA approval.

Some providers in Okaloosa may offer antibody tests. Antibody tests are not used to diagnose a current COVID-19 infection. Rather, these tests detect the presence of antibodies in the blood – if antibodies are present, that indicates that the person has been exposed to the virus and developed antibodies against it.

There is still a great deal about COVID-19 immunity that we don’t yet fully understand. For example, we don’t yet know if the presence of antibodies provides any protection from re-infection nor do we know how long any immunity lasts.

QuestDirect allows individuals to order their own COVID-19 serology test.  

Oneblood is testing all blood donations for COVID-19 antibodies (FDA approved). 

List of FDA approved antibody tests

Cleaning with a household cleaner that contains soap or detergent reduces the amount of germs on surfaces and decreases risk of infection from surfaces. In most situations, cleaning alone removes most virus particles on surfaces. Disinfection to reduce transmission of COVID-19 at home is likely not needed unless someone in your home is sick or if someone who is positive for COVID-19 has been in your home within the last 24 hours.

When and how to clean surfaces in your home

  • Clean high-touch surfaces regularly (for example, daily) and after you have visitors in your home.
  • Focus on high-touch surfaces such as doorknobs, tables, handles, light switches, and countertops.
  • Clean other surfaces in your home when they are visibly dirty or as needed. Clean them more frequently if people in your household are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19. You might also choose to disinfect.
  • Clean surfaces using a product suitable for each surface, following instructions on the product label.

Reduce contamination of surfaces

Take steps in your home to limit contamination of surfaces from airborne particles or from touching surfaces with contaminated hands.

  • Ask unvaccinated visitors to wear masks.
  • Follow guidance for fully vaccinated people before inviting visitors to your home.
  • Isolate people who are sick with COVID-19.
  • Have everyone in your household wash hands often, especially when returning from outside activities.

Clean and Disinfect Your Home When Someone Is Sick

ALWAYS follow the directions on the label.

  • The label includes instructions on how to use the product and specific instructions to keep you safe. Keep disinfectants out of the reach of children. Many products recommend keeping the surface wet with a disinfectant for a certain period of time (see product label).
  • Clean visibly dirty surfaces with household cleaners containing soap or detergent before disinfecting if your disinfectant product does not have a cleaning agent (check the label to verify).
  • Use a disinfectant product from EPA List Nexternal icon that is effective against COVID-19.
    • Read the label to make sure it meets your needs.
    • If products on EPA List Nexternal icon are not available, bleach solutions can be used if appropriate for the surface.
  • Wear gloves for all tasks in the cleaning process.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. Be sure to wash your hands immediately after removing gloves.
  • Ensure adequate ventilation while using any disinfectant.

Learn more about cleaning and disinfecting your home safely and effectively

Mixing Cleaning Products

Another dangerous behavior is the mixing of cleaning products. We are disinfecting our homes more frequently and as products become scarce, some may resort to mixing products not aware that the combinations could be dangerous.

Here are some helpful tips:

  • Never mix cleaning products or other chemicals.
  • Mixing these products and chemicals can create toxic gases. - Exposure to toxic gases like chlorine can lead to significant irritation of the skin and eyes, difficulty breathing, and even death.
  • Do not use professional grade cleaning products in your home.
  • Many cleaning products and chemicals can be irritating and have a strong odor, so open windows and doors to ventilate properly while cleaning.
  • If you feel sick while cleaning, stop immediately, head to fresh air and call Florida’s Poison Control Centers at 1-800-222-1222. Call 911 if someone is having trouble breathing or is clearly in distress. When finished cleaning, store cleaning products and other chemicals up and away, out of reach of children.

CDC recommends delaying travel until you are fully vaccinated, because travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. If you are not fully vaccinated and must travel, follow CDC’s recommendations for unvaccinated people.

Fully vaccinated travelers are less likely to get and spread COVID-19.

People who are fully vaccinated with an FDA-authorized vaccine can travel safely within the United States:

  • Fully vaccinated travelers do not need to get tested before or after travel unless their destination requires it
  • Fully vaccinated travelers do not need to self-quarantine

All air passengers coming to the United States, including U.S. citizens and fully vaccinated people, are required to have a negative COVID-19 viral test result no more than 3 days before travel or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 in the past 3 months before they board a flight to the United States.

Fully vaccinated travelers should still follow CDC’s recommendations for traveling safely including:

  • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth
  • Stay 6 feet from others and avoid crowds
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer

Make sure you understand and follow all airline and destination requirements related to travel, testing, or quarantine, which may differ from U.S. requirements. If you do not follow your destination’s requirements, you may be denied entry and required to return to the United States.

Travel Recommendations for Unvaccinated People

Before you travel:

  • Get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before your trip.
  • Make sure you understand and follow all airline and destination requirements related to travel, testing, or quarantine, which may differ from U.S. requirements. If you do not follow your destination’s requirements, you may be denied entry and required to return to the United States.

While you are traveling:

  • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth. Masks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.
  • Avoid crowds and stay at least 6 feet/2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from anyone who is not traveling with you.
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol).

Before you arrive in U.S.

  • All air passengers coming to the United States, including U.S. citizens and fully vaccinated people, are required to have a negative COVID-19 viral test result no more than 3 days before travel or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 in the past 3 months before they board a flight to the United States.

After you travel:

  • Get tested with a viral test 3-5 days after travel AND stay home and self-quarantine for a full 7 days after travel.
    • Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days.
    • If your test is positive, isolate yourself to protect others from getting infected.
  • If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days after travel.
  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness for 14 days, whether you get tested or not.
  • Self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms; isolate and get tested if you develop symptoms.
  • Follow all state and local recommendations or requirements.

Do NOT travel if you were exposed to COVID-19, you are sick, you test positive for COVID-19, or you are waiting for results of a COVID-19 test. Don’t travel with someone who is sick.

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Spreads through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols, produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes.
  • It is possible that COVID-19 may spread through the droplets and airborne particles that are formed when a person who has COVID-19 coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes. There is growing evidence that droplets and airborne particles can remain suspended in the air and be breathed in by others, and travel distances beyond 6 feet (for example, during choir practice, in restaurants, or in fitness classes). In general, indoor environments without good ventilation increase this risk.
  • Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds and wash hands often
  • Avoid groups of people and limit close contact with others (being within 6 feet for 15 minutes or more)
  • When outside the home practice physical distancing (at least 6 feet)
  • Cover your mouth and nose with an appropriate face mask
  • Cover coughs and sneezes
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces
  • Monitor your health daily, which includes staying home when you have COVID-like symptoms or are waiting for results of a COVID-19 test

In coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Red Cross is seeking people who are fully recovered from COVID-19 to sign up to donate plasma to help current COVID-19 patients.

People who have fully recovered from COVID-19 have antibodies in their plasma that can attack the virus. This convalescent plasma is being evaluated as treatment for patients with serious or immediately life-threatening COVID-19 infections, or those judged by a healthcare provider to be at high risk of progression to severe or life-threatening disease.

A contact investigation to any case of a reportable disease is confidential under Florida Statue.  Your personal and medical information will be kept private.

When public health professionals are notified of a case of COVID-19, we undertake a process called contact tracing. Contact tracing is the process of identification of persons who may have come into close contact with an infected person.

A close contact for someone with COVID-19 is defined as:

  • Anyone who was within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes starting from 48 hours before the person began feeling sick until the time the patient was isolated.

CDC does not recommend testing, symptom monitoring or special management for people exposed to asymptomatic people with potential exposures to SARS-CoV-2 (such as in a household), i.e., “contacts of contacts;” these people are not considered exposed to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Contact tracing for COVID-19 typically involves

  • Interviewing people with COVID-19 to identify everyone with whom they had close contact during the time they may have been infectious,
  • Notifying contacts of their potential exposure,
  • Referring contacts for testing,
  • Monitoring contacts for signs and symptoms of COVID-19, and
  • Connecting contacts with services they might need during the self-quarantine period.

You are still considered a close contact even if you were wearing a cloth face covering while you were around someone with COVID-19. Cloth face coverings are meant to prevent someone from transmitting the disease to others, and not to protect someone from becoming infected.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released a scientific brief that provides options to reduce quarantine time frames. While a 14-day quarantine is the current recommendation of the CDC, there are some additional options for asymptomatic (not experiencing symptoms) close contacts to end quarantine earlier than 14 days.

  1. If an asymptomatic close contact gets tested by a PCR test on Day 6 or later and receives a negative result, then they may end quarantine after completion of Day 7.
  2. Without testing, an asymptomatic close contact may end quarantine after completion of Day 10.

After stopping quarantine, you should

  • Watch for symptoms until 14 days after exposure.
  • If you have symptoms, immediately self-isolate and contact your local public health authority or healthcare provider.
  • Wear a mask, stay at least 6 feet from others, wash their hands, avoid crowds, and take other steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Please note that close contacts connected to health care or other long-term care facility settings with medically vulnerable populations (e.g., long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities, nursing homes, acute care hospitals) and other settings may not end quarantine prior to the 14-day time period.

Masks are a simple barrier to help prevent your respiratory droplets from reaching others. Studies show that masks reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth.

You should wear a mask, even if you do not feel sick. This is because several studies have found that people with COVID-19 who never develop symptoms (asymptomatic) and those who are not yet showing symptoms (pre-symptomatic) can still spread the virus to other people. The main function of wearing a mask is to protect those around you, in case you are infected but not showing symptoms.

A cloth mask also offers some protection to you too. How well it protects you from breathing in the virus likely depends on the fabrics used and how your mask is made (e.g. the type of fabric, the number of layers of fabric, how well the mask fits). CDC is currently studying these factors.

  • CDC recommends that people 2 and older wear masks in public settings and when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when other social distancingmeasures are difficult to maintain.
  • Wear masks with two or more layers to stop the spread of COVID-19
  • Wear the mask over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin
  • Masks should NOT be worn by children younger than two, people who have trouble breathing, or people who cannot remove the mask without assistance
  • Masks offer some protection to you and are also meant to protect those around you, in case you are unknowingly infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • Do NOT wear masks intended for healthcare workers, for example, N95 respirators
  • Wear your mask under your scarf, ski mask, or balaclavain cold weather
  • Keep a spare mask to replace one that becomes wet from moisture in your breath, snow, or rain.
  • Have a nose wire toprevent air from leaking out of the top of the mask
  • Wear a gaiter with two layers, or fold it to make two layers
  • Evaluation of face shields is ongoing, but effectiveness is unknown at this time.

The most effective fabrics for cloth masks are

  • Tightly woven fabrics, such as cotton and cotton blends
  • Breathable
  • Nose wire
  • Two or three layers

Less effective fabrics for cloth masks are

  • Loosely woven fabrics, such as loose knit fabrics
  • Difficult to breathe through (like plastic or leather)
  • Single layer
  • Masks with exhalation valves or vents

2 Ways to have better fit and extra protection

  • Wear two masks (disposable mask underneath AND cloth mask on top)
  • Combine a cloth mask with a fitter or brace
  • Knot and tuck ear loops of a 3-ply mask (disposable mask) where they join the edge of the mask

KN95 masks

  • KN95 masks are a type of filtering facepiece respirator that are commonly made in China and similar to N95 masks commonly used in the United States.
  • Look for KN95 masks that meet requirementssimilar to those set by CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for respirators
  • Do not wear KN95 masks if you have certain types of facial hair, with other masks (wear KN95 alone, counterfeit KN95 mask. About 60% KN95 masks in the United States are counterfeit (fake) and DO NOT meet NIOSH requirements.

Mask use and Carbon Dioxide

A cloth mask does not provide an airtight fit across the face. The CO2 completely escapes into the air through and around the sides of the cloth mask when you breathe out or talk. CO2 is small enough to easily pass through any cloth mask material. In contrast, the virus that causes COVID-19 is much larger than CO2, so it cannot pass as easily through a properly designed and properly worn cloth mask.

Feasibility and Adaptations

In some situations, wearing a mask may exacerbate a physical or mental health condition, lead to a medical emergency, or introduce significant safety concerns. Adaptations and alternatives should be considered whenever possible to increase the feasibility of wearing a mask or to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spreading if it is not possible to wear one.

For example:

  • People who are deaf or hard of hearing—or those who care for or interact with a person who is hearing impaired—may be unable to wear masks if they rely on lipreading to communicate. In this situation, consider using a clear mask. If a clear mask isn’t available, consider whether you can use written communication, use closed captioning, or decrease background noise to make communication possible while wearing a mask that blocks your lips.
  • Some people, such as people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental health conditions or other sensory sensitivities, may have challenges wearing a mask. They should consult with their healthcare provider for advice about wearing masks.
  • Younger children (e.g., preschool or early elementary aged) may be unable to wear a mask properly, particularly for an extended period of time. Wearing of masks may be prioritized at times when it is difficult to maintain a distance of 6 feet from others (e.g., during carpool drop off or pick up, or when standing in line at school). Ensuring proper mask size and fit and providing children with frequent reminders and education on the importance and proper wear of masks may help address these issues.
  • People should not wear masks while engaged in activities that may cause the mask to become wet, like when swimming at the beach or pool. A wet mask may make it difficult to breathe.
  • People who are engaged in high intensity activities, like running, may not be able to wear a mask if it causes difficulty breathing. If unable to wear a mask, consider conducting the activity in a location with greater ventilation and air exchange (for instance, outdoors versus indoors) and where it is possible to maintain physical distance from others.
  • People who work in a setting where masks may increase the risk of heat-related illness or cause safety concerns due to introduction of a hazard (for instance, straps getting caught in machinery) may consult with an occupational safety and health professional to determine the appropriate mask for their setting. Outdoor workers may prioritize use of masks when in close contact with other people, like during group travel or shift meetings, and remove masks when social distancing is possible. 
The time between exposure to the COVID-19 virus and onset of symptoms is typically 2 to 14 days.
  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved one drug, remdesivir (Veklury), to treat COVID-19.
  • The FDA can also issue emergency use authorizations (EUAs) to allow healthcare providers to use products that are not yet approved, or that are approved for other uses, to treat patients with COVID-19 if certain legal requirements are met.
  • The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has developed and regularly updates Treatment Guidelines to help guide healthcare providers caring for patients with COVID-19, including when clinicians might consider using one of the products under an EUA.

The American Red Cross of North Florida is launching a Virtual Family Assistance Center to support families struggling with loss and grief due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. People can visit the Redcross website to access a support hub with special virtual programs, information, referrals and services to support families in need.  People without internet access can call 833-492-0094 for help.

Many families have experienced a disrupted bereavement and grief process due to restrictions related to COVID-19. To help, the Red Cross has set up a virtual team of specially trained mental health, spiritual care and health services volunteers who are:

  • Connecting with families over the phone to offer condolences, support and access to resources that may be available
  • Providing support for virtual memorial services for families, including connecting with local faith-based community partners
  • Hosting online classes to foster resilience and facilitate coping skills
  • Sharing information and referrals to state and local agencies as well as other community organizations including legal resources for estate, custody, immigration or other issue

All Family Assistance Center support will be provided virtually and is completely confidential and free.